PAQA Art Quilt Retreat

I’ve just returned from a retreat with the Professional Art Quilters Alliance (PAQA) (an Illinois-based group I recently joined.)

I got to know many incredible quilt artists, enjoyed the beautiful, sunny view of Lake Michigan and learned a lot from our instructor, Denise Havlan, a nationally-recognized, award-winning artist.

art quilt birch treesI took my machine and a memory quilt project to work on in my spare time (2 half-days) but 1 full day was spent creating this beautiful art quilt with Denise’s helpful instruction. This piece started with a colorful background fabric (orange, yellow, green.) Denise instructed us in using a variety of paints and other colorants to create the dark area in the background for depth, then creating the birch trees from white fabric. We finished by adding shadows, highlights, wildflowers and other accents. We added batting, backing and did some quilting.  I have to tell you—-I LOVE my little quilt! It will had some bright color to my home for spring. And I would love to make another “Birch Trees” quilt—-it was such fun!

My Art Quilt at the Chicago IQF!

I have an art quilt on display at the Chicago International Quilt Festival! This is one of the biggest shows in the country/world and I’m thrilled.

My art quilt is part of a collection of art quilts created by members of The Professional Art Quilters Alliance (PAQA).

These quilts are our submissions to a challenge to create an 18″ square quilt based on the theme “The Midwest”.   Here is my entry, “Harvest of Times Past.”

art quilt at International Quilt Festival

Harvest of Times Past, Amy Cavaness, 01/2015

 

I saw about half of the quilts that will be displayed at our January meeting. The interpretation of the theme, The Midwest, was as varied as the landscape and culture here. Some quilts were whimsical, others more abstract. I consider my style to be Impressionistic.

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What the Midwest means to me:

Our landscape is littered with lovely old homes and barns that have been abandoned. These old buildings seem to represent the evolution of this part of the country. This rich, black soil is what drew the farmers to settle this frontier throughout the 19th and early 20th century. As the farmers came to till the soil, the towns and industries to support them developed around them—evolving into the Midwest we know today. As farming methods evolved, farmers could handle more and more acreage, and the resulting economic changes squeezed out small farmers.  Those old-fashioned farmers moved on, and left their homes and barns to stand as long as they might.

To me, this is “The Midwest” in a nutshell, and the farmhouse I depicted (just a mile from my home) is quite typical. This one isn’t terribly old and still seems quite structurally sound, but the exterior is deteriorating from exposure to the elements.

Midwest farmhouse detail

Techniques

In this first photo you can see how I used fabric and then machine stitching to depict the landscape—the rolling fields and the forest beyond the fields. On the tree I used some light-colored thread stitching to show the low winter sun shining on the trunk and branches.

The second is a close-up of the sky. This is fabric I painted with fabric paints as I find it easier to paint that hunt for just the right fabric sometimes!

art quilt,corn fields,midwest,landscapeart quilt,painted fabric,sky. tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One last detail to share: the binding I used has meaning to me. It’s an old-fashioned print, which seems rather out-of-place on a modern quilt, but that was just the point! These old farmstead seem rather out-of-place anymore on these huge tracts of land. There’s a warmth and sentimentality about them, but they’re outdated, relics of the past—–like the little strip of fabric around my picture!

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art quilt at International Quilt Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in Quilting Arts Magazine

Published in Quilting Arts Magazine

I’m absolutely thrilled to have my art quilts and an article in the latest Quilting Arts  magazine!!!! I’ve subscribed to this magazine for many, many years and truly never dreamed I’d see my own work (and face!) in the publication. But there it is—the Oct/Nov 2014 issue, “In the Spotlight” article.

Quilting Arts Magazine

Latest issue of Quilting Arts magaine

The article features photos of 2 of my quilts (admittedly my favorites), “Peeking” and “Trail Riding”. The first is an art quilt of a little kitten peeking out from under a barn door. The other is a quilt of my husband and me on our horses at Matthiessen State Park here in north-central Illinois. A third quilt is described in the article and displayed on the website.

So grab a copy here to read my article and all the rest—a really fabulous magazine! Every issue has interesting new techniques, new bios of quilt artists and tons of inspiration!!

If you are interested in commissioning an art quilt walling hanging, please contact me. I am accepting commissions for 2015! [contact-form][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Website’ type=’url’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

Discover More of My Work In Altered Couture!

This website has been devoted (mostly) to my quilted works. However, there are so many more ways I love to create with fabric!

The latest issue of Altered Couture has 2 articles  I wrote about altering ready-to-wear garments with vintage barkcloth.

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Sewing with vintage textiles is something I’ve been doing for years and find very satisfying, creatively speaking. Finding beautiful or funky materials from the past isn’t too hard—but what to do with them is a challenge, and one that I enjoy!

Stampington Press publishes numerous magazines for all types of creative artists with inspiration galore. Many articles provide instructions for techniques shown in the spectacular photography. My articles in this issue of Altered Couture both include descriptions of how I created these garments.

If you’d like to purchase this magazine or others from Stampington, you may order directly, subscribe or find them at a retail location near you.

Keep watching……I’ve got more articles in this and other Stampington magazines coming soon!

My Purses in Belle Armoire

 I’m thrilled that 2 purses I created are in the current issue (Feb 1, 2013) of Belle Armoire magazine!!!!

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This is a beautiful publication from Stampington Press (who publishes a large number of magazines, including Altered Couture and Where Women Create.)

The magazine issued a challenge for “Eco Purses,” which were made from upcycled or recycled materials. Well, that’s exactly what I love to do! I create clothing and accessories from all kinds of “green” sources: vintage textiles, thrift store bargains, yard sale finds, and even the back of my closet (the cute Western belt on the green bag is one such find!)

I designed this purse specifically to feature belts or scarves. The handles create belt loops that hold a belt with a great buckle or sash from an old dress or even a scarf. I’ve loved carrying bags from this pattern—they’re not too big and tuck nicely under my arm. I have trouble with purse handles falling off my shoulders, but this one stays put!

I’m readying this pattern for sale here on my website. Drawing out a pattern for myself and creating a pattern and instructions for publication are very different! I’m adding photos to all of the step-by-step instructions to make it as clear as possible. It’s a lot of work and I’m trying to get it done as quickly as possible.

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