Sherman and Titus, Art Quilt Commissions

 

The Gift of Commissions

Art Quilt Pet Portrait

“Your package was delivered yesterday and there are no words to describe how beautiful and perfect the dogs came out.  Your web site, the photos do not capture the beauty of your work.  

It is funny how things happen I found you online and just knew you would do a great job and I am totally impressed with the finish work. 

Thank you again and again.
Dog Portrait Art Quilt
I share this email referencing these art quilts because it meant so much to me. I absolutely loved working on this commission and I’m pleased with how these pet portraits came out. The most important thing, though, is how the client felt about the pieces I created.
Accepting commissions isn’t like creating pieces for art fairs or galleries where you hope someone will like it and purchase it. I’ve done that and it has its own challenges. Customers commission quilts from me because they already have an idea of what they want, they just need it made. My job is to bring their dreams or desires to life. I try to incorporate my artistic vision and expression into a piece that not only meets the desires of the customer, but exceeds them.
One of the things that continues to touch me deeply is the trust my clients offer me. I’m a complete stranger from the big world of the internet. I understand that. I share these excerpts from emails not to brag, but to share my appreciation for the trust someone placed in me. I’m always grateful that someone had faith in me and absolutely delighted that they are so pleased with my work! What a wonderful way to spend my time—artistic self-expression and making dreams come true!

Memory Quit from Men’s Shirts

Quilt from Men’s Shirts

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This is a memory quit from 12 men’s dress shirts.

The man who commissioned this memory quilt requested that I create a Queen sized quilt from his shirts He wanted a contemporary style pieced quilt and even sent me a “rough concept” painting to give me an idea of what he wanted. He didn’t want a memory quilt that had collars, cuffs, etc. I was to only use the fabric from his shirts.

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I enjoy corresponding and collaborating with my customers and Aaron and I exchanged quite a few emails about his quilt. We discussed the color options (given the limited palette of blue and brown with a single shirt with orange in it.)

Memory quilt with Kaffee Fassett backing

Aaron wanted the quilting done on the top with an orange thread.  He chose a Kaffee Fassett fabric for the back that had stripes of different widths on a brown background. I used a dark brown thread in the bobbin. I even sent him ideas for the quilting design so he could give me an idea of what he liked. I ended up doing the quilting in a pattern of squares and rectangles that complimented the overall design.

Piecing

IMG_3355I did  lot of different styles of piecing—some straight edge, some softly curved. I did strip piecing, cut the blocks of strips and switched them around to create new blocks. I cut right through blocks and inserted strips in crisscrossed patterns. I did some log-cabin style piecing, some crazy piecing, some nine-patch type piecing. This was a big exercise in piecing with a very contemporary twist.

 

Limits Push Creativity

62-IMG_3365One of the things I enjoyed most was the challenge of the limited palette. Having boundaries/limits is a great way to push yourself creatively. It seems counter-intuitive to say limits are creatively freeing, but it’s true.

Designing a quilt from someone’s clothing is an exercise in designing with limits. It’s really so much easier to go the quilt shop or dig through a stash and pick out just the right pieces of fabric—and go back and get more if things get challenging. With a memory quilt, I can’t do that. My boundaries are to use whatever I am given and make the most of it.

Aaron was concerned that there wasn’t enough variety of mediums and darks. Well, one thing I did was use the reverse side of some of the fabrics. One of the blues was woven so that the right side was a very pale blue while the wrong side was a rich medium hue. Both of the brown striped fabrics looked much darker on the reverse sides (the stripes were much duller on that side) so I could use those wrong sides as an almost-black. I think from a distance you can’t really tell how few fabrics there are in this quilt!

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Just for fun I took a photo of what was left of the shirts, backing and batting when I was all finished. This is it. I think I did pretty well using up my materials!